Why you should donate to the Django fellowship program

Friday, January 23 2015

Disclaimer: I do not represent the Django Software Foundation in any way, nor has anything below been endorsed by the DSF. The following opinions are my own, unsolicited rambling.

If you hadn’t been looking for it specifically, you may have missed it. The Django Softare Foundation is running a fundraising effort for the new Django Fellowship program. It sounds like they’re still trying to figure out how to get the word out, so I wanted to do what I could to tell you why you should chip in.

This particular blog post is going to focus on encouraging (peer-pressuring) commercial Django users in particular, though enthusiasts are welcome to read along!

Humble beginnings

Django is free and open source. Just provide the expertise and the infrastructure and you can build just about whatever web powered contraption you’d like. So you end up doing just that.

Your first stop is the Django tutorial, written and maintained by a community of volunteers (just like the rest framework itself). You stumble along, slowly at first. Perhaps you find yourself frustrated at times, or maybe things move along at a faster pace. In no time, you’ve got "Hello World!" rendering, and here comes a business idea!

One hundred lines of code turns into a thousand, then five thousand, and beyond. You start seeing signups, and revenue begins to trickle in. You toil away at your codebase, making improvements and dealing with the "accidental features" that crept in during one of your late night dev sessions.

You could have built your business on one of any number of frameworks, but you chose Django. You like how it’s a very productive way to build a web app. You appreciate how it’s not impossible to find Django developers to work with you. There are probably some things you don’t like, but you might not have the time to work on fixing them yourself. You’re just busy shipping and growing.

But it could be better still!

You’re happily using Django, it serves you well. There are a few things you’d love to see fixed or improved, but you don’t really have the time or expertise to contribute directly. As luck would have it, all of the Django core developers have day jobs themselves. Things would progress much more quickly if we had someone working full-time on Django…

Enter: Django Fellowship Program. The idea is to fund at least one Django developer to work for the DSF part or full-time for a while. During this fellowship, said developer sets aside some or all of their other responsibilities to focus on improving Django. The DSF, in turn, pays the developer a fair (but low rate) for their work.

As per the Tim Graham’s recent retrospective blog post, we’ve see some huge leaps forward for the project during these fellowships. These are periods of focus and rapid improvement that everyone (including your business) benefit from.

The only problem is that we’re not going to see the benefits of this program unless it gets (and stays) funded. A well-funded fellowship program could mean one (or more) developers working on Django full-time at any given point in time. That would be huge for the project (and you and I).

Why you should donate

As a business, we are donating to the fellowship program to see one of our critical components improved. Due to the fellowship application process, you can be assured that your money will be paying a capable, trusted developer to get things done.

Consequently, you can view a donation to the Django Fellowship program as an investment with an almost assuredly positive return. If you are making money with Django, consider making a (potentially tax-deductible) investment in what may be the foundation of your business.

At the end of the first full day of fund-raising, there are precious few commercial donors listed in the "Django Heroes" leaderboard. Let’s help change that!

If you don’t hold the purse strings at your business, get in touch with someone who does and tell them about this investment with near-guaranteed returns.


Let’s play: python-gotalk

Friday, January 23 2015

A recent HackerNews post announced Gotalk, a simple bidirectional protocol. I can imagine your collective eyeballs rolling. "Oh great, yet another half-baked way for… things to talk to one other". But keep following along, maybe you’ll see something you like. Here are some highlights:

  • By Rasmus Andersson - You may ...
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python-colormath 2.1.0 released

Sunday, January 11 2015

python-colormath 2.1.0 has landed, bringing with it some excellent new features and bug fixes. See the release notes for a more detailed look at the changes.

The headlining feature is the replacement of our hardcoded conversion tables with NetworkX-based resolution of color conversions (courtesy, Michael Mauderer). Color ...

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Networked, multi-container image crawling with Docker and fig

Saturday, January 10 2015

An example of a networked, multi-container image crawler using Docker and fig.

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python-colormath 2.0 released!

Saturday, May 03 2014

python-colormath was started back in 2008, when I was an undergraduate at Clemson University (Go Tigers!). While there are a good number of people out there making use of the module effectively, there were a lot of things I wanted to do differently in an eventual 2.0 release. There ...

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Fabric task for notifying New Relic of a code deploy

Monday, February 11 2013

A brief example Fabric task for notify New Relic of code deploys.

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Switched to Pelican

Sunday, February 10 2013

For the last four years, my blog has been powered by Django. As I have found myself becoming more and more busy, I have stopped wanting to hassle with keeping things up to date on the server and the application.

After a weekend of tinkering and conversions, I’m now ...

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Ansible first impressions

Friday, February 08 2013

After brief visits with Puppet and Chef for config management, I’ve set my sights on Ansible. It’s late and I’ve been staring at this stuff for way too long today, but here are some early observations:

  • I really like that it is written in Python. Puppet and ...
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Amazon Elastic Transcoder Review

Wednesday, January 30 2013

Amazon Elastic Transcoder was released just a few short days ago. Given that we do a lot of encoding at Pathwright, this was of high interest to us. A year or two ago, we wrote media-nommer which is similar to Amazon’s Transcoder, and it has worked well for us ...

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python-route53 released!

Wednesday, November 14 2012

After some more time in the cooker, python-route53 1.0 has landed on PyPi. This is a stand-alone Route 53 package, independent from the one in boto. The major hilights are:

  • Python 2.7 and 3.x compatibility.
  • Extremely simple API
  • Powered by requests

Read the documentation, see the source ...

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